Israeli tech turns jellyfish into paper towels || By David Shamah


Diapers choke landfills, and the icky sea creatures choke beaches and waterways. Cine’al has one solution for both problems

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Cine’al Ltd., an Israeli nanotechnology start-up, is developing technology to turn jellyfish into “super-absorbers,” making the much-disdained sea creature suitable for use in diapers, tampons, medical sponges, even paper towels.

Jellyfish have been the bane of Israeli beaches in recent years, as warmer ocean temperatures have made coastal waters more hospitable for the creatures. During spring and early summer, millions of them appear near beaches, shoot their poison into the water and make swimming next to impossible. Where jellyfish abound, the water is likely to be empty.

Side Note;

Out of more than 720 prizes awarded since 1901, more than 130, or about 18 percent, have gone to Jewish laureates. Jews have won almost three times the number of awards won by either Germany or France (including their Jewish winners), and 10 times those won by Japan. Jews comprise only 0.3 to 0.5 percent of the world’s population.

By 2007, Israel was working on their 159th Nobel Peace Prize.

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Israel upgrades Apache helicopters after U.S. blocked their modernization || by WorldTribune.com


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Israeli AH-64D Apache Longbow

The sources said the Air Force was equipping the Apaches with two new electronic warfare systems developed in the Jewish state.

“They are based on the huge operational experience of the force in using the Apache Longbow in a variety of combat scenarios,” an officer, identified only as Maj. Yonatan, said.

The upgrade has been developed amid the U.S. refusal to modernize Israel’s Apache fleet, employed in attacks on the Hamas-ruled Gaza Strip.

The sources said the administration of President Barack Obama blocked Israeli efforts to modernize the Apaches or purchase new helicopters from Boeing.

The new Israeli systems were cited by the official magazine of the Air Force. The sources said the sensors underwent trials in early 2014 and would be integrated on the Apaches later this year.

The sources said the Air Force would enhance the AH-64A helicopter to D configuration. They cited such capabilities as avionics, EW and advanced munitions, including the AGM-114 Hellfire, produced by the U.S. firm Lockheed Martin.

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Israel’s Commercial Jets Will Soon Be Firing Lasers || By Allen McDuffee | Courtesy: COURTESY: LtCol Mark A McDonald, USMC (Ret) – MILINET


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Israel is finally ready to combat shoulder-launched missiles and they’re going to do it with lasers.

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Israel’s Ministry of Defense announced Wednesday that SkyShield, developed by Israeli defense contractor Elbit Systems, had successfully completed testing and is certified for commercial use to combat the threat of man-portable surface-to-air missile systems (MANPADS) by combining advanced laser detection and disruption technologies.

C-MUSIC, the commercial version of SkyShield, integrates laser technology with a thermal camera to deflect incoming threats by jamming. After detecting incoming missiles with an infrared sensor, it fires a laser that disrupts the missile’s navigation system, taking it off course and detonating the missile a safe distance from the aircraft.

Image: Elbit Systems

Image: Elbit Systems

“SkyShield has been validated under the most complex and sophisticated testing conditions ever conducted in Israel and is now ready to protect Israeli airlines,” said Israel Air Force Brig. Gen. Eitan Eshel, director of research and development at Israel’s Defense Ministry.

The technological advancement is a direct response to the 2002 attempt by terrorists in Mombasa, Kenya in which two surface-to-air missiles were fired at an Israeli charter plane shortly after takeoff. The missiles missed their target and its more than 250 passengers, but the event prompted then-Prime Minister Ariel Sharon to call for an urgent defense response.

Read More Here: http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2014/03/skyshield/