Today in US military history: Marines hammer the Japanese on Guadalcanal, and 8 days in a trash can Unto the Breach ^ | Aug. 21, 2017 | Chris Carter…………………………………………


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Today in US military history: Marines hammer the Japanese on Guadalcanal, and 8 days in a trash can
Unto the Breach ^| Aug. 21, 2017 | Chris Carter

Posted on 8/21/2017, 10:17:07 AM by fugazi

1942: On Guadalcanal, around 900 soldiers of Japan’s 17th Army slam into about 2,500 Marines manning positions along Alligator Creek. Wave after wave of Japanese soldiers are cut down by the Marines, killing well over 700 attackers – including the Japanese commander – while inflicting nearly 100 percent casualties.

1944: The F8F-1 “Bearcat” – Grumman’s last piston-powered fighter – makes its first flight. The warplane can fly faster and climb more quickly than the venerable “Hellcat”, but enters service too late to see action in World War II. The Blue Angels will begin using the Bearcat for their demonstrations, and many Navy and Marine aviators – including Neil Armstrong – consider…

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2 thoughts on “Today in US military history: Marines hammer the Japanese on Guadalcanal, and 8 days in a trash can Unto the Breach ^ | Aug. 21, 2017 | Chris Carter…………………………………………

  1. Was your father there? I know that when I read of places where 82d Abm was in WW2, sometimes I get an eerie feeling. In fact, I had arrested a person who nearly killed himself running a steady red light, with traffic going pretty good. I was watching the light to write a red light ticket and this guy just flies across the intersection about 45 mph. I light him up and discover he is a drunk driver. Booze in the car. Almost falling over himself. The car was a Mercedes convertible and I couldn’t leave that on the street and rather impound it, asked him if anyone could pick it up. He called his father who was about 60 miles away. I was going through the car and see some books, all with Third Reich soldiers, and wondered if the guy was a white supremacist, and I questioned him. He tells me, that his father and his father’s brother were born in Germany but came to America as young children. When Hitler said for all Germans to return, his uncle left, and became an officer in the Germany army. The book, one of them, had a photograph of the officer in charge of the bridge at Remagen. It was his uncle. I told him almost with a shit-eating smile, my father’s platoon took, the bridge at Remagen. Though drunk, the man was a nice guy. The father shows up and I asked him about his brother, and he confirms what I was told, then the man tells his father what I said about my father, and the father looked into open space, stared, and said, “All those years ago, my brother tried to kill your father, and tonight, you save my son’s life”. Chills.

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    • Love this story on all levels………Most importantly, it shows how important each of our lives are and it how great and small an impact our lives have on others….It comes down to making the right choices.
      Momma’s Daddy had polio as a young child and couldn’t serve, but his Oldest Son Jack fought the latter part of WWII in Germany, and went on to fight in Korea. Daddy had several uncles fight in the Japanese campaign but aren’t sure where they fought at, one was a Sailor the other a Marine, he was why Dad joined th4e Marines.
      Uncle Jack came to really despise both the Koreans and Chinese because as he would often say, we saved Chinese butts during WWII and not five years later they were killing our boys. He never got over that……

      Liked by 1 person

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