Unbelievable: Drowning Man Prepares To Sue His Rescuers || by B. Christopher Agee


Citizens who might otherwise consider lending a helping hand could easily view this and other lawsuits as sufficient justification for neglecting the needs of others.
Read more at http://www.westernjournalism.com/drowning-man-prepares-sue-rescuers/#HY29PpiOST3wlHMP.99

Citizens who might otherwise consider lending a helping hand could easily view this and other lawsuits as sufficient justification for neglecting the needs of others.

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In America’s increasingly litigious culture, it is truer than ever that no good deed goes unpunished. The first responders who risked their lives saving a man trapped in his sinking car last year learned this lesson when they received notice that they could face a lawsuit stemming from their heroic act.

Last September, as Roy Ortiz drove to work in Boulder County, Colo., he reportedly lost control of his vehicle on a flooded road and ended up in a nearby creek. While he survived for two hours by using a tiny air pocket within the car, he would not have lived much longer without the decisive actions of individuals who pulled him to safety.

Ortiz, however, feels he might be entitled to a half million dollars in addition to his new lease on life.

According to his attorney, he is not only naming the county in his potential lawsuit–he also names his rescuers. Ed Ferszt said his client filed the “preservative” intent to litigate the issue as a means to deal with his subsequent medical costs.

While action against the county would generally hinge on the belief that the road on which Ortiz was traveling should have been closed during the flood, Ferszt said first responders face the threat of a lawsuit because they did not initially realize Ortiz was in the vehicle they were retrieving.

“He was not seen or it was assumed no one could have survived it,” the attorney claimed. “No one discerned he was there.”

In any event, though, Ortiz is now alive and capable of filing a lawsuit – something that would have been impossible if not for the bravery of these now-targeted first responders.
Read more at http://www.westernjournalism.com/drowning-man-prepares-sue-rescuers/#HY29PpiOST3wlHMP.99

In America’s increasingly litigious culture, it is truer than ever that no good deed goes unpunished. The first responders who risked their lives saving a man trapped in his sinking car last year learned this lesson when they received notice that they could face a lawsuit stemming from their heroic act.

Last September, as Roy Ortiz drove to work in Boulder County, Colo., he reportedly lost control of his vehicle on a flooded road and ended up in a nearby creek. While he survived for two hours by using a tiny air pocket within the car, he would not have lived much longer without the decisive actions of individuals who pulled him to safety.

Ortiz, however, feels he might be entitled to a half million dollars in addition to his new lease on life.

According to his attorney, he is not only naming the county in his potential lawsuit–he also names his rescuers. Ed Ferszt said his client filed the “preservative” intent to litigate the issue as a means to deal with his subsequent medical costs.

While action against the county would generally hinge on the belief that the road on which Ortiz was traveling should have been closed during the flood, Ferszt said first responders face the threat of a lawsuit because they did not initially realize Ortiz was in the vehicle they were retrieving.

“He was not seen or it was assumed no one could have survived it,” the attorney claimed. “No one discerned he was there.”

In any event, though, Ortiz is now alive and capable of filing a lawsuit – something that would have been impossible if not for the bravery of these now-targeted first responders.

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6 thoughts on “Unbelievable: Drowning Man Prepares To Sue His Rescuers || by B. Christopher Agee

  1. The state opened themselves up for that to happen. In New York, suicide is unlawful, as well as aiding a suicide, and attempted suicide. I it were New York, he would be arrested, and not have any ground to stand on as first responders were doing their jobs and, there is also a Good Samaritan Laws, covering regular people that go above and beyond.

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    • Same as is here in SC!
      Those who have attempted suicide and have survived, were hit with huge rescue and hospitalization cost, which many argue is morally wrong…No Pun Intended.

      My ex wife had a friend who jumped off the Cooper river bridge and 100′ down, landed on a huge coil of rope on a barge breaking literally, every bone in her body or fracturing them. She Survived…
      Was billed over $200.000, the cost her health insurance didn’t pay, and was charged for the rescue units and personnel…
      3 years later, she jumps from the lower end of the same bridge because she was over whelmed by the constant pain caused by her earlier but failed attempt to take her life and the monthly bills she was paying out to the rescue services…She jumped into the marsh and lands in the soft Puff Mud, this stuff lives up to it’s name in every way, “stuck chest deep in the puff mud and once again broken all the hell to pieces, but alive, she is billed again for an even higher amount because her extraction was made more difficult, her being 500′ from solid land mass! And to far into the marsh for a boat rescue…
      She complained for years about this costing her so much and that it was, her exact words….Morally Wrong for them to charge me, when I was so desperate to kill myself.
      I can’t tell you the number of things that instantly ran through my cold heartless mind that I wanted to say to her.

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      • When I was a rookie, I grabbed a jumper off the outside ledge of a bridge. He tried to take me with him, but I was too lean and as strong as a farmer. I handcuffed him and it made the front page. I was taken back to the stationhouse where at least 45 minutes, every cop working came in and yelled at me non-stop for being stupid, and I should have let the guy jump. I was punished and had to walk a beat in all weather at all hours day and night. Then finally when they were short handed they made me drive a seventeen year old patrol car with 1950s paint color scheme. I was transferred after that.
        That was the first jumper. Second one was when I was a sergeant, but this time I was salty and nobody dared talk down to me (and keep their teeth).

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    • How in the world could they expect you to let someone take their life, when you could stop them, or try to?
      I simply couldn’t live with myself if I did that!…
      You did the right thing as far as I’m concerned!
      NY, I can imagine there were a lot of jumpers.

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      • Cops try to talk people from jumping. I walked on the outside catwalk of a bridge and grabbed the guy.
        The attitude is let them go or they can take you with them, which that guy did try to do.
        The next time, it was icy cold, windy night in February. Woman. Retired school teacher suffered a breakdown. I grabbed her and she wiggled but was no match. I talked quietly to her, handcuffed her then put my uniform coat around her as she was in a sheer nightgown. Two bosses from the old way of doing things started up with me, and I lit a Camel, and let them know how it was and how it was going to be. They saw that I was not in any mood for it, and walked out. Three stripes on my arm, means no way they are changing my mind or convincing me of anything. The woman was hospitalized. The next day, her two daughters showed up and thanked me. Nobody had anything to say. All the cops just looked.

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      • Awesome story!
        You should write some sort of memoir of your experiences there, sounds really interesting…

        Like

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